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MUS 103A: Symphonic Band

The Symphonic Band rehearses at least twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. The band experience includes classic and contemporary band literature and often features guest artists. Numerous ensembles are formed from among band members, providing additional instruction and performance opportunities. Students wishing to participate in Symphonic Band as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 103B: Chamber Winds

The Chamber Winds, for the advanced instrumentalist, rehearses twice weekly and performs two concerts per semester. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Chamber Winds as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 103C: Jazz Ensemble

The "Big Cat" Jazz Ensemble rehearses twice weekly and performs at least one concert per semester. This group focuses on jazz style, performing music representative of many eras of jazz history, with emphasis on swing and improvisation. The band performs contemporary arrangements as well as classic tunes from the jazz repertoire, giving attention to proper performance techniques. Participation is by audition. Music performed is advanced traditional and classic wind ensemble literature, often featuring guest artists. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Jazz Ensemble as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 103 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 104: String Chamber Orchestra

The String Chamber Orchestra consists of string players from the College and surrounding community. This group rehearses twice a week and performs at least once each semester. Music ranges from the Baroque era to popular contemporary. Smaller string ensembles are formed from the larger group, providing experience in chamber music performance. Students wishing to participate in String Chamber Orchestra as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 104 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 105A: Concert Choir

The Concert Choir rehearses twice weekly in preparation for various on-campus programs. The choir experience includes choral literature from chant through the present, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Concert Choir as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

MUS 105B: Women's Chorale

The Women's Chorale rehearses twice weekly in preparation for various on-campus programs. The chorale experience includes literature from chant through the present written specifically for women's voices, giving all members opportunity for personal vocal development through a variety of choral traditions. Membership is determined by audition. Students wishing to participate in Women's Chorale as a non-credited course must fulfill credited class requirements and have permission of the director.

Students receive one course unit of credit upon completion of four semesters of MUS 105 with a grade of C or better. For non-majors, this fulfills the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. An additional four semesters may be taken for elective credit.

MUS 109: Applied Music Lessons

This repeatable course is equivalent to one-quarter unit for a one-half hour private lesson per week per semester. A student will receive one course unit of credit (elective only) after successfully completing (with a grade of C or better) four semesters of MUS 109. The grade for each semester is determined by a jury performance evaluation. This course cannot be used to satisfy the General Education: Foundations: Fine Arts requirement. Students are expected to spend three hours per week in outside preparation and to advance according to the level of their ability. Students registering for any section of MUS 109 are automatically placed with a teacher who will contact them to arrange a lesson time. Students wishing to take Applied Music Lessons without academic credit must fulfill credited lesson requirements. See the department chair for details. NOTE: An additional music lab fee accompanies this course.

MUS 113: Rags, Rock and Rap: Popular Music and American Culture

This course explores the genesis of popular music in English-speaking North America from the colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the period beginning in the 1890s just before the breakout of jazz, to the present-day multi-billion dollar industry of rock, pop, R&B, rap/hip-hop, country, dance/electronica and the emergent world styles that also form part of the evolving contemporary American musical scene. Lectures place equal emphasis on the musical styles themselves and their social context, including the role of composers, audiences, promoters, money, and music industry organizations. Lectures and discussion are enlivened by diverse music listening experiences. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 120: Music Appreciation: Introduction to Western Music

This course offers an overview of Western classical musical styles, with an emphasis on the symphonic repertory and music by well-known composers such as Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Tchaikovsky. Other genres including opera, chamber music, the art song and church music are also explored. The course focuses on developing basic musical vocabulary and listening skills, skills that are also applicable to listening to and thinking about popular musical styles. The connections between music and social context are also discussed. Concert attendance and listening assignments are part of the course experience.
Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 122: Music in World Cultures: An Introduction

A grand tour of the musical styles of the world's large culture regions: sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Islamic world, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Amerindia, and the Western world. Students are introduced to basic musical concepts with emphasis on understanding musical instrument types and their characteristic sounds. Students listen to recordings of ancient and medieval folk music types of traditional rural communities (work songs, harvest songs, lullabies); the art music of the aristocratic courts (including the South Asian raga and the Western symphony); and the modern musical styles emerging in the contemporary urban and electronic age, from Chinese rock to African rap. Film viewings help students link the diverse musical sounds with social contexts. A visit from a world musician is planned each semester.

MUS 125: All That Jazz

This course covers jazz history from its obscure origins in the post-Civil War period to the present. The focus is on important instrumentalists and vocalists of the 20th century, and how they helped to create the different jazz and jazz-related styles, including: ragtime, blues, hot jazz, Dixieland, swing, bebop, cool jazz, free jazz and jazz fusion. Among the key performers and composers to be discussed are Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Herbie Hancock and Keith Jarrett. Basic concepts of jazz performance and various jazz styles are explored through independent research, listening and discussion. When possible, field trips to live jazz performances are incorporated. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement

MUS 126: Music and the Cinema

This is an introduction to the role of music in cinema, with emphasis on North American films between the 1930s and the present. Students learn how music aids in the creation of mood, atmosphere and characterization in films. Special topics include music in the silent film era, musicals, science fiction and horror films, the role of women as subjects and creators in modern cinema, music in the avant-garde and experimental cinema, popular music, rock and rap in film soundtracks, and music in selected non-Western film industries. Films to be discussed include classics such as Star Wars, The Godfather and Casablanca, as well as popular recent releases. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 135: Introduction to Music Theory

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of music theory. Topics include pitch notation, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords and simple harmonization, and rhythmic notation. This course is designed for students with little or no musical background. Satisfies General Studies: Foundations (Fine Arts) requirement.

MUS 211: Theory and Aural Skills I

This course focuses on developing a foundation of basic knowledge in musical theory, tonal harmony, ear training, sight-singing and dictation. Students increase their ability to read, write and understand music according to prescribed guidelines of musical structure through skills obtained by examining and practicing the musical elements of intervals, scales, chord construction, diatonic part-writing, and melodic and rhythmic sight-singing and dictation. Prerequisite: MUS 135 (may be exempted by placement exam)

MUS 212: Theory and Aural Skills II

A continuation of MUS211, this course expands upon the musical elements previously studied and includes the use of chromatics, secondary dominants, seventh and ninth chords and analysis of harmonic structure.  Individual student projects are oriented towards analysis and introductory composition.  The course also includes further development of aural skills introduced in the previous semester. Prerequisite: MUS 211 (may be exempted by placement exam)

MUS 231: Music and Sound Design for Games and Video

This class will examine the creation and application of music and sound design as used in contemporary games, video, and other digital media. A focus will be placed on the relationship of audio to user experience and as a method of feedback in traditional and non-traditional gaming systems. The student will learn how to mix and synchronize soundtrack elements to video. Both the development process and consideration of final product will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 265

MUS 243 The Business of Music: An Introduction

This course will introduce students to the business aspects of the music industry, including marketing and promotion, copyright law, publishing, contracts, licensing, management, concert promotion and production. Today’s musicians must be equally versed as businesspeople to find or create careers in music. This course will provide a detailed introduction to diverse topics in the music business field. Students will learn skills and attain knowledge to help them succeed as a musician beyond performing.

MUS 244 Music Marketing and Promotion

This course introduces key music marketing principles, terms, and practices, which together form the foundation for all music-marketing plans. Students will develop an integrated approach to music marketing in the focus areas of licensing, press, retail, distribution (online and traditional), radio, advertising, merchandising, and touring. The information in this course can form the basis for a full marketing campaign, or be immediately implemented into an existing marketing and promotion plan. Prerequisite: MUS 243

MUS 250 Live Audio Production

This course offers students an introduction into the principles of audio technology with an emphasis on mixing for a live performance.  Topics include mixing techniques, microphone types, signal flow, equalization methods, and other types of signal processing.

MUS 251 Recording Technology

This course develops and masters many of the foundational skills introduced in MUS 250, but, rather than for the arena of live audio production, the student will learn to apply them in the recording studio as a mixing engineer. This course covers the history, tools, and techniques of music recording technology. Class lectures will be paired with hands-on use of professional technology as the student learns recording systems, signal flow, and advanced mixing techniques. The emphasis of this course is on creative musical projects using professional recording and mixing tools in a production environment. Prerequisite MUS 250

MUS 275: Healing Effects of Music: An Introduction to Music Therapy

This course examines the beneficial effects of music on the human mind and body. Students who have an interest in the relationship between music and health will explore the varied uses of music therapy, both within and without mainstream medical practices, educational institutions, correctional facilities, senior centers and private practice. This is accomplished through a combination of course materials, guest speakers, research, and field observations.

MUS 287: History of the American Musical

This course engages in a panoramic view of the American Century through the lens of one of its most inimitable creations -- the Broadway Musical. From this vantage point we examine compelling connections between the historic and artistic development of this quintessentially American of all art forms with the socio-economic, cultural, political, and technological advances that fueled its’ inception, zenith, decline, and contemporary rebirth. Throughout our journey, students will develop a strong, interdisciplinary arts vocabulary of elements, theories, and practices that will enable us to hone a keen appreciation for the collaborative process involved of “putting together” a musical theatre work for the live commercial stage. With our skills finely tuned, we will then focus our learned attention toward a capstone project aimed at helping us predict Broadway’s future marketplace and cultural impact. Satisfies General Studies: Connections Requirement.

MUS 341 Concert Promotion

This course furthers students' knowledge of the music business by developing an understanding of marketing, promotion and contract negotiation within the scope of concert production. Students will be responsible for planning, promoting, scheduling, and selling a fictional domestic tour of their choice. Through relevant projects, each student experience multiples careers surrounding the greater subject of concert promotion. Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 342 From Demo to Distribution

This course traces the steps of the music production process from the creation of a demo to national distribution. Students take part in simulating the day-to-day operations of a recording company, from selection of the artist through distribution of product. Students work with current artists to help create, manage, and market a professionally recorded demo or album. Throughout the development of each project, students will gain an understanding of releasing a musical product to physical and online retailers. Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 344 Artist Management

How does the manager help the artist succeed in the music business? Through contacts and an insight into the music industry; by being prepared, realistic, flexible and persistent; and by having a strategy for the artist to make his or her own opportunities. This course provides an overview of key artist management principles, terms, and practices. Students will be responsible for creating a mock management and financial plan to assess their ability organize short and long-term goals. Students will be assigned to a current artist and help manage different aspects of their career, including but not limited to touring, concert promotion, fiscal planning, and marketing.  Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 345 Music Law

This course provides an overview of laws relating to the entertainment industry. Specifically, students will be studying the history of Copyright Law and the development of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Stop Online Piracy Act. Students will also research relevant cases in the music industry to analyze recording/management contracts, review important court depositions, and investigate the foundations for the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and the Stop Online Privacy Act. In addition, the course suggests ways in which artists can protect themselves by arming themselves with knowledge and proper representation.  Prerequisite: MUS 244

MUS 351 Music Production

Music Production is designed to harness the skill sets introduced in MUS 251 Recording Technology toward the Production of Music in the digital domain. Beginning with the history and artistry of music composition within the digital domain, students will then learn how to compose diverse styles of music (hip-hop, electronica, pop and others) for a variety of purposes. The pedagogic emphasis of this course is on creative musical projects using professional mixing and electronic composition tools such as MIDI, synthesis, and sampling. Prerequisite: MUS 212 and MUS 251

MUS 360: Songwriting

This course introduces students to the craft of songwriting.  Students will study specifics of song structure and analyze different musical styles.  The course will also combine the study of lyrics, melody, harmony, and rhythm used to create songs.  Students will collaborate with their classmates creating joint works and will create individual works as well.  In addition, in-class songwriting workshops will give the students a chance to gain feedback on their pre-existing works from the instructor and classmates.  Music Business concepts in regard to copyrights, licensing and trade organizations and basic music theory terminology will also be discussed.  Prerequisite: MUS 212

MUS 361 Commercial Arranging

This course teaches and develops skills necessary to arrange vocal and instrumental ensembles for a variety of popular genres from a technical, theoretical, and historical perspective. Through the examination of popular songs for their use instrumentation and arrangement, students will learn to compose idiomatically for a variety of instruments and to effectively arrange these instruments together in an ensemble. Prerequisite: MUS 360

MUS 491: Internship

The music business seminar is a practical, off-campus work experience that requires students to participate in daily operations of a music business career. A minimum of 11 on-site hours per week is required.
 Prerequisite: MUS 244 and 250.

MUS 495 Senior Seminar

This course assists students in the creation of their own business. Students will attain historic knowledge of industry specific entrepreneurs and develop their own enterprise based upon their knowledge. Through industry relevant projects, students must research various businesses related to their area of interest, propose a prospective business, create a business plan, develop a corporate structure, market their enterprise, and seek out prospective employees. Prerequisite: Senior Standing MIS Major/Co-Major and completion at one (1) MUS 300 level course.