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MAJORS AND MINORS

Majors and Minors in the Psychology Department 

These requirements are effective beginning with the Class of 2018.  Please click the link below for the requirements for earlier classes.

Requirements for Class of 2017 and Earlier

 

Major in Psychology

The bachelor of arts degree program in psychology provides a balance of theoretical and applied courses in the discipline and prepares you for graduate study, professional school, or careers in social services, business, research and educational settings.

Requirements

  • All of the following core requirements: 
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • One of the following research laboratory courses: 
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment (recommended for those pursuing careers in clinical or school psychology)
    • PSY 396: Advanced Research Lab in Social, Personality, or Developmental Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Three from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Three from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
    • PSY 306: Special Topics (Biologically-based)
  • Three from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • IDS 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 396 or 397: Advanced research lab (with a different emphasis as taken above)
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship
  • One related course (200-level or higher) in the social or natural sciences or an additional psychology course (200-level or higher)

Total: 15 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Combined Major in Psychology      
Students may elect to combine Psychology with any other major. Required courses in Psychology are:

  • All of the following core requirements: 
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar

Note: Sociology co-majors may take SOC210 Research Methods and SOC211 Statistics instead of PSY200 and PSY201, and if so, they must take any 2 additional psychology courses in place of PSY200 and Psy201

  • Two from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • One from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment
    • PSY 396/397:Advanced research lab
    • IDS 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship

Total: 9 courses (2 captured for General Studies)


Child Development Track
The Psychology Department offers a track in Child Development. This track is primarily for full Psychology majors but may be completed by Combined Psychology majors and students in other majors (such as Child & Family Studies and Psychobiology) who have the prerequisites. 

  • Requirements
    • PSY 240: Child Development
    • PSY 391: Child Psychopathology
    • 400-level Child-Focused Psychology course
    • One from the following:
      • PSY 306: Social Development
      • PSY 345: Language Development
      • PSY 401: Child-Focused Field Experience/Internship (if not used for requirement #3)
      • PSY 406: Child-Focused Seminar (if not used for requirement #3)
    • Two from the following:
      • PSY 345: Language Development
      • PSY 346: Social Development
      • PSY 401: Child-Focused Field Experience/Internship (if not used for requirement #3 or #4)
      • PSY 406: Child-Focused Seminar (if not used for requirement #3 or #4)
      • SOC 203: Human Services
      • SOC 261: The Family
      • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
      • SOC 415: Childhood & Adolescence
      • ENG 233: Children’s Literature

Interdisciplinary Major in Psychobiology
The bachelor of science in psychobiology is intended for students with an interest in both the behavioral and natural science approaches to psychology and biology. The major is especially ideal for developing an appreciation of the emerging fields of neuroscience and health psychology. Individuals arrange courses to satisfy their particular interests and prepare for advanced study in psychology, psychobiology, biology, behavioral ecology, veterinary medicine and the health professions (medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, optometry), or employment in varied areas including pharmaceutical research or sales and allied health professions. Psychobiology majors must declare one of two tracks:  Molecular Psychobiology Track (more biologically oriented) or Behavioral Psychobiology Track (more psychologically oriented).

Behavioral Psychobiology Track
The Behavioral Psychobiology track is more psychologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in health psychology, behavioral research, and some mental health related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements: (6 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • Biology core requirements:  (2 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure & Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
  • One from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Psychology):
    • PSY 206: Social Psychology
    • PSY 250: Personality
    • PSY 230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY 390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
    • PSY 306: Special Topics (Biologically-based)
  • Three from Group III (Biological Science): (one MUST be at least 300 level)
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 220: Evolution (152 or203)
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History (152)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (151)
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (151, 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (151, 152, CHE105)
  • Two Elective courses:
    • Any PSY course not previously taken
    • Any BIO course not previously taken
    • CHE105- General Analytical Chemistry I

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)

Molecular Psychobiology Track
Students must declare one of two tracks for the Psychobiology major. The Molecular Psychobiology track is more biologically-oriented and is intended for those pursuing graduate work in neuroscience, the medical field, and other related fields.

  • Psychology core requirements:  (5 courses)
    • PSY 100: General Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 200: Research Design and Analysis I (fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative Reasoning course)
    • PSY 201: Research Design and Analysis II
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 397: Advanced Research Lab in Biological, Cognitive, or Evolutionary Psychology
  • Biology/Chemistry core requirements:  (4 courses)
    • BIO 151: General Biology I: Structure and Function (fulfills GS Foundations Natural Science course)
    • BIO 203: Introduction to Genetics
    • CHE 105: General Analytical Chemistry I
    • CHE 106: General Analytical Chemistry II
  • Two from Group I (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Psychology):
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
    • PSY 306: Special Topics (Biologically-based)
  • Two from Group II (Molecular Biological Sciences):
    • CHE 207:Organic Chemistry I
    • BIO 220: Evolution (152 or 203)
    • BIO 321: Microbiology  (151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 322: Cell Biology (151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 325: Molecular Genetics (151, 203, CHE207)
    • BIO 327: Histology and Microtechniques (151)
    • BIO 329: Virology (203)
  • One from Group III (Organismal Biological Sciences):
    • BIO 152: General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology, and Evolution
    • BIO 234: Human Anatomy and Physiology I
    • BIO 235: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
    • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (151)
    • BIO 333: Developmental Biology (151, 203)
    • BIO 337: Comparative Animal Physiology and Ecophysiology (151, 152, CHE105)
    • BIO 398: Animal & Human Nutrition (151, CHE207)
  • One Elective course in any PSY or BIO not previously taken
  • One Senior Seminar:
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
    • BIO 490’s: Senior Seminar

Total: 16 courses (3 captured for General Studies)


Interdisciplinary Major in Child and Family Studies
The interdisciplinary major in Child and Family Studies is for students interested in psychosocial approaches to child development and family dynamics. This B.A. degree program, which combines Psychology and Sociology (Family Studies Track), provides the breadth and depth required to work in human services or to pursue graduate studies in human development, psychology or family studies.

Psychology Requirements:

  • All of the following core requirements: 
    • PSY 100: Introductory Psychology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science course)
    • PSY 405 or 406: Senior Seminar
  • One of the following research methods sequences must be completed to satisfy core requirements:
    • SOC 210: Research Methods and SOC211 Statistics
    • PSY 200: Research Design I and PSY201: Research Design II. (PSY200 or SOC211 fulfills GS Foundations Quantitative reasoning requirement)
  • Two from Group I (Social, Developmental, and Clinical Approaches):
    • PSY206: Social Psychology
    • PSY250: Personality
    • PSY230: Human Development -OR- PSY240: Child Development
    • PSY390: Adult Psychopathology -OR- PSY391: Child Psychopathology
  • Two from Group II (Biological, Cognitive, and Evolutionary Approaches):
    • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
    • PSY 305: Behavioral Neuroscience
    • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
    • PSY 340: Cognition
    • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
    • PSY 355: Motivation
    • PSY 360: Sensation and Perception
  • One from Group III (Elective courses):
    • *Any of the above courses not already taken
    • PSY 210: Health Psychology
    • PSY 215: Positive Psychology
    • PSY 220: Theories/Treatment of Addictive Behavior
    • PSY 265: Ecological Psychology
    • PSY 271: Organizational Psychology
    • PSY 290: Diversity
    • PSY 291: Cross-cultural Psychology
    • PSY 294: Drugs, Addictions and Society
    • PSY 306: Special Topic courses in any area
    • PSY 310: Health Behavior Change
    • PSY 330: Human Sexuality
    • PSY 321: Close Relationships
    • PSY 345: Language Development
    • PSY 346: Social Development
    • PSY 377: Epigenetics and Behavior
    • PSY 394: Counseling
    • PSY 395: Psychological Assessment
    • PSY 396/397: Advanced Lab
    • IDS 303: Sex Roles
    • PSY 401: Fieldwork
    • PSY 281, 381, 481: Independent Study/Advanced Research
    • PSY 282, 382, 482: Internship

Sociology Requirements:

  • All of the following core requirements:
    • SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology (fulfills GS Foundations Social Science requirement)
    • SOC 213: Social Theory
    • SOC 490: Senior Seminar
  • Additional specialized family course requirement:
    • SOC 261: The Family
  • To Complete Core - Either Group Below:
    • SOC 210 & SOC211
    • PSY200 & PSY201
  • One of the following lower level specialized courses:
    • SOC 203: Human Services
    • SOC 270:  Parenting and Technology
    • SOC 271:  Work & Family Conflict
  • Two of the following intermediate specialized courses:
    • SOC 302: Juvenile Delinquency
    • SOC 311: Domestic Violence
    • ANT 320: Sex, Gender, Culture
  • One of the following advanced application courses:
    • SOC 470: Immigration & Transnat’l Families
Total: 17 courses (2 captured for General Studies)

Evolutionary Studies Minor
The Evolutionary Studies Minor is meant to create opportunities for faculty and students at Albright to (a) develop a deep understanding of evolutionary ideas, (b) conduct cross-disciplinary research using evolution as a synthesizing paradigm, and (c) contribute to novel ideas across disciplines guided by evolutionary reasoning. Contact Dr. Susan Hughes at 610-929-6732, shughes@albright.edu for more information.

  • Curriculum:
    • PSY 100: General Psychology
    • BIO 203: Genetics or BIO 152 General Biology II: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution
    • Two of the following:
      • PSY 319: Evolutionary Psychology
      • BIO 220: Evolution 
      • ANT 342: Human Evolution
    • One of the following:
      • PSY 319, BIO 220 or ANT 342 (if not already taken from course 3 & 4 options)
      • PSY 205: Biological Psychology
      • PSY 350: Animal Behavior and Cognition
      • PSY 265/ANT 265: Ecological Psychology
      • BIO 319: Vertebrate Natural History
      • BIO 331: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 
      • BIO 494: Mammalian Evolution 
      • ANT 285: The Human Animal
      • ANT 320: Sex/Gender/Culture
      • PHI 140: Human Nature
  • Additional courses: If special Seminars or Special Topics classes arise that may be pertinent to this program, students may petition their advisors to have other courses count toward this program.
  • Includes opportunities for Independent Study and involvement in faculty research to fulfill program requirements.